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Sunday, February 10, 2008

Endangered Snow Tiger

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PHOTO REMOVED AT REQUEST OF ARTIST DANIEL RICHMOND.
EnDangered Snow Tiger. - by Daniel Richmond

PHOTO REMOVED AT REQUEST OF ARTIST DANIEL RICHMOND.
Approach with caution.

UPDATE 2/20/08: This post originally included three photographs of a snow sculpture of a large animal (tiger?) skull in a public park, part of an advertised small-town outdoor sculpure festival, taken on a snowy day. The guy who made it, Daniel Richmond, pretty much demanded that I remove them... legalities were mentioned... he's not worth it!
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7 comments:

ericgelber said...

What is that made out of?

Martin said...

snow!

maybe there is an armature under there? i don't know.

but we'll find out soon enough.

ericgelber said...

Because of the coloration I thought it was dirt, sand, muck, blended with cement or some other adhesive material.

We are getting pounded with snow in the Adirondacks. I see so many amazing environmental epiphanies up here, but they come and go so quickly I wouldn't be able to capture them for posterity even if I was prepared for them (camera in hand, etc.). The piles of snow do change how everything looks. It is such a complete transformation that it is difficult to remember how things looked before they got completely or partially buried. A snow covered landscape has an apocalyptic element to it that I truly love.

Today for instance, it isn't snowing but it is extremely cold and windy out. So these amazing tornado funnels and shifting walls of snow crystals whip up and fill the entire field of vision and then quickly disappear. These thick and thin gauzes of frozen water particles are near and far, rising and falling simultaneously, moving in several different directions at once. On the horizon I see snow dotted mountains and gun metal gray sky.

Time to eat the other pop tart. Have a good day.

Martin said...

it was made, then got dirty, and in this photo taken saturday it is snowing... so the dirty snow tiger here has a sprinkle of fresh white powder.

ericgelber said...

You bring up a good topic; the amazing sculptures known as dirty snow. When I lived downstate I used to love studying tenacious clumps of snow. All the snow would melt and disappear, except for a few stubborn clumps of it that would be packed with vile filthy things, too horrible to name. The irony of course was that these pollutants also helped the snow fight off the melting process. The filth and the snow became inextricably intertwined.

Anonymous said...

actually, he is worth it.

Martin said...

well, he's definitely not worth dealing with. pictures are gone. satisfied? good, see ya.

why on earth would anyone choose to make something in a public park and then have a hissy that pictures were taken?